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of stories. >> thanks for joining us. now that speech on british domestic policy by david cameron. his remarks are from earlier this summer at imperial college in london. [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction and for your kind words about the need for honesty, openness, and transparency about public spending, something the prime minister and i the skull -- discussed in a slightly less calm and mysterious they. i want to thank imperial college for inviting me to speak here. you do have a remarkable history. these innovations have put willpower into people's hands and have changed the world. i want to talk about people power and the change we need in this country. after the political crisis this year, the consensus for change is overwhelming, but the reality so far has been, let's be frank, underwhelming. the announcement of a behind the doors iraq inquiry, and a prime minister who has talked about restoring the authority of parliament but is still going around making announcements on the radio. if you are serious about change, you need a consistency of argument and a c
invention. we have not used that word before. what is the role of the federal government before, during, and after these events? is additional authority needed to address response and recovery from these events? we cannot sit by and merely hope that out size to disasters such as hurricane katrina and 9/11 will never occur again. our obligation to the public requires investigation by the subcommittee to prepare us for the possibility of these contingencies. hese contingencies. wrecking katrina make landfall august 29th 2005 and prove to be the most costly natural disaster in american history. on congress and particularly the subcommittee have spent the nearly four years since katrina looking at the action of the federal current as well as state and local governments, voluntary agencies as citizens themselves from response to recovery. which continues to this day. on the golf course -- on the gulf coast. today's hearing focuses on next that the. of what it did we learn from hurricane katrina as well as other disasters in the united states and the air around the world practice concerning w
media, news paster at b.g.e. newspapers and broadcasters. >> we appreciate you for joining us with the press association. thanks for the update. now that speech by william hague, the british conservative e party's shadow foreign secretary. his remarks are from earlier this summer in london. [applause] >> thank you and good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. it is a great pleasure to be here again, and thank you again for hosting. the third time in four years i have spoken around the 21st of july here in this room. parliament cannot go into recess until i have delivered my speech each year. i do indeed remember you assuring me that i would only be required for half an hour on television, and two hours later i was still sitting there answering the questions. two hours up translator arabic make a lot more sense than two hours in the house of commons, so i was pleased to do it. running at its highest since the end of the second world war, there is no doubt that the principal legacy of the current government's to its successes into the next generation will be debt, and get on a scale
. can you give us a quick overview of what that was and whether that benefits one party over another? >> what happened was, as a result of court rulings, the mp's were required to publish details of all their expenses. they were going to do this in a limited fashion, but as the details caught linked to -- got leaked to the newspaper. day after day they were publishing details of expenses, some of them really quite shocking what was being claimed. it did a lot of damage across the political spectrum. . . gavin cordon, what is organization all about? >> awful range of stories. it is essentially the media broadcasts, newspapers, it can be picked up by foreign media as well. >> thank you for joining us. now that speech on foreign- policy by david cameron. these remarks are from earlier this summer. >> thank you for those words about honesty and openness about public spending, something that prime minister and i discussed in a less calm atmosphere yesterday. you have a remarkable history in just over a century, you found the discovery of penicillin, fiber optics, and have a 14 noble laure
control of the u.s. commander. it doesn't mean you've given up authority. you could recall those forces and higher levels of control continue to exist. you mention the national guard. when we deploy national guard forces to other states, which is a similar parallel, i've done this this year alone from wisconsin to both north dakota for the floods and kentucky for the ice storm, i give tactical control those guardsmen who, in fact, become state assets for the states to which we deploy them. and i certainly reserve the right or governor doyle reserves the right to recall them if needed. but i think from a unity of command, unity of effort point of view, the best thing to do unless and until the federal government needs to take command for the emergency being so drastic, so severe in which case we'd all get behind the president, i think the best thing is to stick with both state and federal guidance which is lowest level up and from that perspective we wouldn't be talking -- probably wouldn't be talking lots of federal troops. we'd be talking about a company of engineers, or a small capabi
injuries are the results of another person's negligence. i don't think any of us want to prevent people from receiving fair compensation. you have expressed yourself that way as well. it seems to me the nba has verified by the wrinkled decision, provides device manufacturers, some level of protection from litigation, many avenues remain open. >> that is correct. >> under current law patient can sue a manufacturer if the device fails. >> it is a very complex issue as to exactly where product liability would be cut off and would not. if the manufacturer follow the requirements of fda laid down in the p.m. a approval, which is very specific, they said exactly how the device will be made and how it will be labeled. if those are followed, there could be no liability. if they fail to follow them, you are correct, there could be. >> if there is a manufacturing defect, what about that? >> that would mean, if you are saying there is failure to follow the fda requirement, that kind of the fact, yes. but there is one thing we have to understand, drugs have problems, they don't act perfectly, and a
to be dealt by all of us if we restore confidence in politics. it means restoring confidence in all politics and all members of a lot -- the parliament being part of that process. the leadership as about the whole political system responding to changes that need to be made and that they have act now and immediately to change the system. >> and this idea that they should not keep any profits from selling a second home. >> that is why i have always thought we should do away with this, stop any taxpayer-funded mortgages altogether. until the new rules are in place, we committed ourselves that handing back to the taxpayer every pound of every gain made when a second home is sold. could he commit -- >> order, let the hon. gentleman speak. >> could he at least make that commitment? >> i hope that people will also speak of our hard-working members of parliament doing their duty and their orderly way and not trying to make any money, but simply to serve the public. it is very important that we get some context into this debate. where there are problems, they need to be sorted out. where there are di
>> we appreciate you, gavin cordon, for joining us. thank you for the update. that speech by william hague, the british conservative party's shadow foreign secretary. this was at the institute for strategic studies in london. >> thank you and good afternoon. it's great to be here again at iiss. i think this is the third time in four years that i have spoken on the 21st of july, parliament cannot go into our recess until i deliver my speech. i thank you for assuring me that i would only be 30 minutes on television and i was still sitting there two hours later. but two hours of arab translation versus the same time in parliament is different. the coming general election will be of extraordinary magnitude, with the proportion of national income running at its highest as the second world war, there is no doubt that the principal legacy of the current government to its successors and the next generation will be that, and that on a scale that will take many years to scale back. -- will be debt, and get on a scale that will take many years to scale back. we must not forget the focus on moun
officer or their representative and ask, are you sure you wanted us to do this? so clearly that is a philosophical approach of, hey we have to protect the taxpayers' dollars. >> sir, we do the right thing. we are a significant piece of our business is training and mentoring and we work ourselves out of business over time, that is the intent of a big piece of our begin. so we're used to working through a program, working down work scope to try and do the right thing. over the last year i can give you examples of where we have laid people off on cost-plus programs trying to get costs out of the system so that we could have and tlifr to the government a more cost-effective, better value system. so in the example that you raised it is a hypothetical example, but to me that doesn't pass the goofy test, doing the right thing we come forward and say that is not something we'd be interested in doing. >> mr. walter? >> with respect to your examples, sir, that is a case where the government is speaking with one voice would be great. under our contract we did renovate a dining facilit
that has to be dealt by all of us if we are to restore confidence in politics. means restoring confidence and all politics, and it means all members of parliament be part of that process. leadership is about all of the political system responding to the changes that need to be made. it is me saying to all the political parties that they have to act now and immediately to change the system. >> he turned to the idea of the they should not be able to keep the profits they make from selling a second home. >> we are here to serve our constituents. i have always thought we should do what they do in scotland, which is simply stop any tax payer funded mortgages altogether. until the new rules are in place, we have committed ourselves to handing back to the taxpayer every pound of any gain made on second homes are sold which had been funded by the taxpayer. could he commit? >> let the right hon. gentleman speak. >> could he at least make that commitment? >> i hope people will also speak up for the hard working members of parliament who are going about their duty in the ordinary way and not trying
in dealing with many of the problems of the financial system. it was us that first recognized the need to recapitalize the banks and that simply providing lick witity was not going to be enough. and it was us who recognized that we would have to take shares in the banks as well if we were going to deep the financial system moving forward. i think you will find a lot of countries have been following what britain did. we should not get into a debate here when this is a global economy. we have to consult with other countries as well as britain, and the system in britain is one that is actually relevant to other countries around the world. >> we did a lot for recapitalization of the banks. but independent of the bank of england was a major selling point for the government in 1997. has it ended up with a two-edge sword for the government right now? >> not at all. i think we need a history book perspective. inflation was the major problem we faced for 50 years. every government, whether labor or conservative, was bedeviled by the problem of inflation. it got up to double digits physician as
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11